Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes (Great Books of the Western World, #5) #2020

Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes (Great Books of the Western World, #5) By Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes Great Books of the Western World AeschylusThe Suppliant MaidensThe PersiansSeven Against ThebesPrometheus BoundAgamemnonChoephoroeThe Eumenides SophoclesOedipus the KingOedipus at ColonusAntigoneAjaxElectraThe TrachiniaePhiloctetes E
  • Title: Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes (Great Books of the Western World, #5)
  • Author: Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 241
  • Format: None
  • Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes (Great Books of the Western World, #5) By Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers AeschylusThe Suppliant MaidensThe PersiansSeven Against ThebesPrometheus BoundAgamemnonChoephoroeThe Eumenides SophoclesOedipus the KingOedipus at ColonusAntigoneAjaxElectraThe TrachiniaePhiloctetes EuripidesRhesusMedeaHippolytusAlcestisHeracleidaeThe SuppliantsTrojan WomenIonHelenAndromacheElectraBacchantesHecubaHeracles MadPhoenician WomenOrestesIphigeneia in TaurisI AeschylusThe Suppliant MaidensThe PersiansSeven Against ThebesPrometheus BoundAgamemnonChoephoroeThe Eumenides SophoclesOedipus the KingOedipus at ColonusAntigoneAjaxElectraThe TrachiniaePhiloctetes EuripidesRhesusMedeaHippolytusAlcestisHeracleidaeThe SuppliantsTrojan WomenIonHelenAndromacheElectraBacchantesHecubaHeracles MadPhoenician WomenOrestesIphigeneia in TaurisIphigeneia at AulisCyclops AristophanesThe AcharniansThe KnightsThe CloudsThe WaspsPeaceThe BirdsThe FrogsLysistrataThesmophoriazusaeEcclesiazousaePlutus
    Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes (Great Books of the Western World, #5) By Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers
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      241 Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers
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    About "Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers"

    1. Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes G.M. Cookson Richard Claverhouse Jebb Edward Philip Coleridge Benjamin Bickley Rogers

      Aeschylus 525 BC 456 BC squilo in Portuguese, Esquilo in Spanish was an ancient Greek playwright He is often recognized as the father or the founder of tragedy, and is the earliest of the three Greek tragedians whose plays survive extant, the others being Sophocles and Euripides According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in plays to allow for conflict among them previously, characters interacted only with the chorus Unfortunately, only seven of an estimated 70 plays by Aeschylus have survived into modern times one of these plays, Prometheus Bound, is sometimes thought not to be the work of Aeschylus.At least one of Aeschylus works was influenced by the Persian invasion of Greece, which took place during his lifetime His play The Persians remains a good primary source of information about this period in Greek history The war was so important to Greeks and to Aeschylus himself that, upon his death around 456 BC, his epitaph included a reference to his participation in the Greek victory at Marathon but not to his success as a playwright.There are no reliable sources for the life of Aeschylus He was said to have been born in c 525 in Eleusis, a small town about 27 kilometers northwest of Athens, which is nestled in the fertile valleys of western Attica, though the date is most likely based on counting back forty years from his first victory in the Great Dionysia His family was both wealthy and well established his father Euphorion was a member of the Eupatridae, the ancient nobility of Attica As a youth, he worked at a vineyard until, according to the 2nd century AD geographer Pausanias, the god Dionysus visited him in his sleep and commanded him to turn his attention to the nascent art of tragedy As soon as he woke from the dream, the young Aeschylus began writing a tragedy, and his first performance took place in 499 BC, when he was only 26 years old After fifteen years, his skill was great enough to win a prize for his plays at Athens annual city Dionysia playwriting competition But in the interim, his dramatic career was interrupted by war The armies of the Persian Empire, which had already conquered the Greek city states of Ionia, entered mainland Greece in the hopes of conquering it as well.In 490 BC, Aeschylus and his brother Cynegeirus fought to defend Athens against Darius s invading Persian army at the Battle of Marathon The Athenians, though outnumbered, encircled and slaughtered the Persian army This pivotal defeat ended the first Persian invasion of Greece proper and was celebrated across the city states of Greece Though Athens was victorious, Cynegeirus died in the battle Aeschylus continued to write plays during the lull between the first and second Persian invasions of Greece, and won his first victory at the city Dionysia in 484 BC In 480 he was called into military service again, this time against Xerxes invading forces at the Battle of Salamis This naval battle holds a prominent place in The Persians, his oldest surviving play, which was performed in 472 BC and won first prize at the Dionysia.Aeschylus was one of many Greeks who had been initiated into the Eleusinian Mysteries, a cult to Demeter based in his hometown of Eleusis As the name implies, members of the cult were supposed to have gained some sort of mystical, secret knowledge Firm details of the Mysteries specific rites are sparse, as members were sworn under the penalty of death not to reveal anything about the Mysteries to non initiates Nevertheless, according to Aristotle it was alleged that Aeschylus had placed clues about the secret rites in his seventh tragedy, Prometheus Bound According to some sources, an angry mob tried to kill Aeschylus on the spot, but he fled the scene When he stood trial for his offense, Aeschylus pleaded ignorance and was only spared because of his brave service in the Persian Wars.Aeschylus traveled to Sicily once or twice in the 470s BC, having

    998 thoughts on “Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes (Great Books of the Western World, #5)”

    1. Here we have a striking instance of the weakness of the star rating system a system that I ordinarily have no problems with For I believe it is entirely possible and reasonable to respond to the question How much did you enjoy this book with a star rating But with this book, than any other so far, I felt flummoxed.Did I enjoy reading the book Yes I did But that enjoyment was not of a simple or continuous kind not that I demand simple, continuous enjoyment from things, least of all from books Re [...]


    2. Thanks to the Sands of Time, we have about 10% of the total output from these 4 Greek playwrights, and while my fellow Classicists tell us we have the best of the best essentially , some of these plays may make you go oh so Admittedly, that s only a few of them Some of Aeschylus s works seemed unimpressive in that way like the Suppliant Maidens , but since he is effectively inventing the genre, I don t want to delve into Classicist blasphemy by pursuing an unimpressed reaction Perhaps we can lik [...]


    3. So I read everything but most of the plays by Aristophanes I found most of the other plays a good learning experience one or two were awful but two plays into Aristophanes I just couldn t stomach it any Too crude, the humor isn t funny, and I don t know any of the politicians or events being mocked Life is too short, and I have too many other things I want to study I m moving on.


    4. Wonderful to realize where our dramatic traditions derive from They were ahead of their time in many ways My favorite was Aristophanes, who seems to have invented the comedic constructs still used in sketch and musical comedy today.


    5. Various plays which expand on themes of Iliad and Odyssey Even if you have haver read any of these plays, many of the stories will be familiar since several modern stories and movies are based on them I did not much like Aristophanes Too much satire.


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