Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years #2020

Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years By Helen Keller Philip S. Foner Helen Keller Her Socialist Years Helen Adams Keller author political activist lecturer was the st deafblind person to earn a BA She campaigned for women s suffrage labor rights socialism other radical causes S
  • Title: Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years
  • Author: Helen Keller Philip S. Foner
  • ISBN: 9780717800872
  • Page: 462
  • Format: Paperback
  • Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years By Helen Keller Philip S. Foner Helen Adams Keller 6 27 1880 6 1 68 , author, political activist lecturer, was the 1st deafblind person to earn a BA She campaigned for women s suffrage, labor rights, socialism other radical causes She was as an advocate for the disabiled, a suffragist, a pacifist, an opponent of Woodrow Wilson, a radical socialist a birth control supporter In 1915 sHelen Adams Keller 6 27 1880 6 1 68 , author, political activist lecturer, was the 1st deafblind person to earn a BA She campaigned for women s suffrage, labor rights, socialism other radical causes She was as an advocate for the disabiled, a suffragist, a pacifist, an opponent of Woodrow Wilson, a radical socialist a birth control supporter In 1915 she George Kessler founded the Helen Keller Internat l organization, devoted to research in vision, health nutrition In 1920 she helped to found the ACLU She traveled to over 40 countries She met every President from Grover Cleveland to Lyndon B Johnson was friends with famous figures like Alexander Graham Bell, Charlie Chaplin Mark Twain Keller Twain were both considered radicals at the beginning of the 20th century As a consequence, their political views have been forgotten or glossed over She was a member of the Socialist Party campaigned wrote in support of the working class from 1909 to 1921 She supported SP candidate Eugene V Debs in each of his campaigns for the presidency Before reading Progress Poverty, she was already a socialist who believed that Georgism was a good step in the right direction She later wrote of finding in Henry George s philosophy a rare beauty power of inspiration, a splendid faith in the essential nobility of human nature Newspaper columnists who had praised her courage intelligence before she expressed socialist views now called attention to her disabilities The editor of the Brooklyn Eagle wrote that her mistakes sprung out of the manifest limitations of her development She responded to that editor, referring to having met him before he knew of her political views At that time the compliments he paid me were so generous that I blush to remember them But now that I have come out for socialism he reminds me the public that I am blind deaf especially liable to error I must have shrunk in intelligence during the years since I met him.Oh, ridiculous Brooklyn Eagle Socially blind deaf, it defends an intolerable system, a system that is the cause of much of the physical blindness deafness which we are trying to prevent She joined the Industrial Workers of the World in 1912, saying that parliamentary socialism was sinking in the political bog She wrote for the IWW between 1916 1918 In Why I Became an IWW, she explained that her motivation for activism came in part from her concern about blindness other disabilities She also cited the 1912 strike of textile workers in Lawrence, MA for instigating her support of socialism.
    Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years By Helen Keller Philip S. Foner
    • [MOBI] ✓ Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years | BY ↠ Helen Keller Philip S. Foner
      462 Helen Keller Philip S. Foner
    • thumbnail Title: [MOBI] ✓ Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years | BY ↠ Helen Keller Philip S. Foner
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      Published :2020-04-09T10:52:33+00:00

    About "Helen Keller Philip S. Foner"

    1. Helen Keller Philip S. Foner

      Helen Keller would not be bound by conditions Rendered deaf and blind at 19 months by scarlet fever, she learned to read in several languages and even speak, eventually graduating with honors from Radcliffe College in 1904, where as a student she wrote The Story of My Life That she accomplished all of this in an age when few women attended college and the disabled were often relegated to the background, spoken of only in hushed tones, is remarkable But Keller s many other achievements are impressive by any standard she authored 13 books, wrote countless articles, and devoted her life to social reform An active and effective suffragist, pacifist, and socialist the latter association earned her an FBI file , she lectured on behalf of disabled people everywhere She also helped start several foundations that continue to improve the lives of the deaf and blind around the world As a young girl Keller was obstinate, prone to fits of violence, and seething with rage at her inability to express herself But at the age of 7 this wild child was transformed when, at the urging of Alexander Graham Bell, Anne Sullivan became her teacher, an event she declares the most important day I remember in all my life Sullivan herself had once been blind, but partially recovered her sight after a series of operations In a memorable passage, Keller writes of the day Teacher led her to a stream and repeatedly spelled out the letters w a t e r on one of her hands while pouring water over the other This method proved a revelation That living world awakened my soul, gave it light, hope, joy, set it free There were barriers still, it is true, but barriers that could in time be swept away And, indeed, most of them were In her lovingly crafted and deeply perceptive autobiography, Keller s joyous spirit is most vividly expressed in her connection to nature Indeed, everything that could hum, or buzz, or sing, or bloom, had a part in my education Few know what joy it is to feel the roses pressing softly into the hand, or the beautiful motion of the lilies as they sway in the morning breeze Sometimes I caught an insect in the flower I was plucking, and I felt the faint noise of a pair of wings rubbed together in a sudden terror The idea of feeling rather than hearing a sound, or of admiring a flower s motion rather than its color, evokes a strong visceral sensation in the reader, giving The Story of My Life a subtle power and beauty Keller s celebration of discovery becomes our own In the end, this blind and deaf woman succeeds in sharpening our eyes and ears to the beauty of the world Shawn Carkonen

    214 thoughts on “Helen Keller: Her Socialist Years”

    1. I went through one of my periods of political activism during the eighties, spurred in part by the aggressions of the Reagan administration, in part by a friend simply asking me to help out with the activities of the Socialist Party in Illinois, in part by the fact that my girlfriend later, wife was involved in the disabled rights movement Reading Keller s writings and speeches neatly combined my interests in disabled and socialist activism.The essays and addresses aren t, for the most part, dee [...]


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